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Doing shank runs on that Renner action. I replace the hammers and shanks by Renner original ! Sometime later I'll glue new hammers. ... See MoreSee Less

7 days ago

Doing shank runs on that Renner action. I replace the hammers and shanks by Renner original ! Sometime later Ill glue new hammers.

SANITIZING YOUR PIANO KEYS - PLEASE SHARE

To whom is concerned into piano playing, teaching, retailing, servicing, delivering, cleaning in general.

The uncertain time we are all experiencing, put us in question on the right manner to sanitize our keyboard and piano. My recent experience in a auto mecanic workshop showed me that cars, under current pandemic health and safety regulation, must now being sanitize by a trained staff, prior and post service by our professional mecanic.
The product they use is largely available in car accessory stores.

I would recommend any persons who play the piano into a sharing circumstance to, similarly to our car repairer, sanitize the instrument and the keys, using this product (the illustration is just to give an example, other brand/label may be as good)

This product does not contain alcohol. I would use with no hesitation on new/recent pianos, which cabinets are made of polyester lacquer. If you are unsure, you may try first on unconspicuous area. I would avoid to use it on ivory/ebony keyboard as well as spirit based lacquer (old fashion cabinet). It smells is very discreet, and i do not know any case of allergy about it (always read the label)

The operation is to use a sprayer (hair dresser or empty window cleaning sprayer) on a microfiber cloth before rubbing on the surfaces of the instrument and keys. Do not spray the product directly in the keys.
... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago

SANITIZING YOUR PIANO KEYS - PLEASE SHARE

To whom is concerned into piano playing, teaching, retailing, servicing, delivering, cleaning in general. 

The uncertain time we are all experiencing, put us in question on the right manner to sanitize our keyboard and piano. My recent experience in a auto mecanic workshop showed me that cars, under current pandemic health and safety regulation, must now being sanitize by a trained staff, prior and post service by our professional mecanic. 
The product they use is largely available in car accessory stores. 

I would recommend any persons who play the piano into a sharing circumstance to, similarly to our car repairer, sanitize the instrument and the keys, using this product (the illustration is just to give an example, other brand/label may be as good)

This product does not contain alcohol. I would use with no hesitation on new/recent pianos, which cabinets are made of polyester lacquer. If you are unsure, you may try first on unconspicuous area. I would avoid to use it on ivory/ebony keyboard as well as spirit based lacquer (old fashion cabinet). It smells is very discreet, and i do not know any case of allergy about it (always read the label)

The operation is to use a sprayer (hair dresser or empty window cleaning sprayer) on a microfiber cloth before rubbing on the surfaces of the instrument and keys. Do not spray the product directly in the keys.

Comment on Facebook

Vincent, I've had two questions about this If you know the answers: 1: is it also antiviral? 2: what can be used on ivory?

Simon Thew, thought this might be relevant to the stuff Nicolette has been saying.

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FAQ’s

How do Humidity and temperature affect my Piano?
Extreme temperature and high hygrometry are affecting the piano’s tuning and overall condition.
Where should I locate my Piano?
To prevent an unstable piano, avoid placing your piano on outside walls, near fireplaces, doors, windows or any area where the humidity is unstable.
How often should I have my Piano looked at?
Piano should be attended idealy once every 6 month (because we have 4 seasons !) Less frequent tuning could be acceptable according to circumstances, that you are welcome to discuss with the piano technician on site. You should not wait over a year to get it tune.
How long after shifting should I wait to have my Piano tuned?
A new piano may requires more time to be tuned before its parts being properly bed, and the piano to be set, so a tuning few weeks after the move, and another one within 6 months may not be overkill. A second hand piano should be set already, and if the condition changes from source to destination are not too big, a tuning after a couple of week should be enough.
You may check the Category “PIANO PURCHASER GUIDE” for more illustrated information !

Repairs & Restoration

  • icon-plus-square  Piano Tuning
  • icon-plus-square Pitch raise and Voicing
  • icon-plus-square Regulation of maintenance
  • icon-plus-square Valuation and Condition Report
  • icon-plus-square High quality genuine* part replacements
  • icon-plus-square Repair and Mending
  • icon-plus-square Cabinet in site Repair and buffing
  • icon-plus-square Silencer System installation and Service